Posted in Uncategorized

Garden Treasures ~ Don’t leave it all behind!

Tips on how to take some of your hard-earned garden beauties with you to your new home location.  I’m moving from almost 5 acres in a small town of 1100 people to a suburb of Omaha with a population of close to 23,000 people on less than a quarter of an acre lot!  Urban/Suburban gardening is my future…edible landscaping, square foot gardening, making use of vertical space…this is what I’m in for!

Tomatoes grown from Seed
A little patience a viola!

As an avid gardener, I cannot see walking away from four years of sweat equity for someone else to enjoy without me taking a least some of it with me.  I’ve done it before, many times and I’m about to do it again.  That’s right!  I’m going to transfer several types of shrubs, woody florals, and fruit.

Because I’m not going to stay in this present location, but want a salsa garden at my new home towards the end of June., I have purchased 3 varieties of tomatoes (Better Boy, Brandywine, and a Russian heirloom) and Jalapeno & Bell Peppers.  These have been transplanted once to the next size larger pots until we close on our new home and move in!

Three years ago my daughter and I rescued some beautiful irises that were inappropriately planted under the shade of a Black Walnut tree!  First off, juglone is a toxic chemical released from the roots of a Black Walnut tree and few things grow successfully under them.  They didn’t bloom , they didn’t produce additional rhizomes, and looked quite miserable.  We dug them up and planted them in newly created beds in full sun.  Since transplanting them, each rhizome has multiplied at least four times.  The beds are full and have bloomed beautifully the last two years.  I’m going to cut the green tops off of several rhizomes and dig up at least 1o to bring along with me to our new home.

There’s also a barely surviving mass of lilac twigs someone planted too close to several other trees which have never bloomed.  I’ll dig up quite a bit of root mass, transplant into a pot this weekend…and in three weeks, they’ll be planted in full sun in our new yard and we’ll see blooms about two years from now.  The Forsythia is another woody floral that grows easily from cuttings…just cut five inch cuttings off of your current branches, shove them in a pot of Miracle Grow potting soil, keep watered well, and you’ll find they’ll be rooted in a few short weeks.  You can also start these in a jar of water just like you can with Pussy Willows.

I’m also taking about 15 – 20 Red Raspberry canes with me.  This process is similar, I’ll dig up plenty of the root system around the new growth at the edges of the patch of raspberries after cutting the canes back to about 10 inches.  I’ll have to make sure the moisture in the soil mass remains consistent through the coming 90 degree days without being too soggy.

Some of the other plants I intend to transplant are herbs:  Sage, Oregano, Thyme, Tarragon, and Lavender.  I also have a patch of Horseradish and Rhubarb I’ll take starts from and bring to my new garden as well.

In spite of my limited ground space at my new home, I will evaluate the existing landscape and make conscious choices to change the specimens currently in residence to a more fruitful/productive form of vegetation.  There’s a group of ferns growing on the South side of the new house…they’re quite healthy and have spread into the yard.  I plan to dig up a couple of patches of these and plant them into decorative urn-style pots to display on the front porch.  It will class up the curb appeal and help me create more garden space!

Just one last note before I close.  If you haven’t tried growing your own garden plants from seed–you really should try.  Its far more cost effective, fun and your kids and neighbors will get to explore the journey from some barely visible seeds to amazing and delicious beauties.  Herbs germinate easily and as long as you’re careful with your watering and light exposure, you’ll have a beautiful herb garden to compliment your culinary creations all year long.

Enjoy!  Please share your green thumb therapy…go ahead, tell us what exciting inner-city or suburbia gardening projects you’re working on.

Advertisements